Alterations

Alterations Men Women Children. Really?

It’s a Sign. Of something.

Every week on my way home from the supermarket I drive by an unpretentious dry cleaning establishment. It offers same day service. On the side of the building there is a startling banner which proclaims: Alterations Men Women Children.

It’s not so much the punctuation issue, although that probably is an issue. You know – the difference between “Let’s eat, Grandma,” and “Let’s eat Grandma.”

It’s the idea one could alter oneself overnight which fascinates me. How convenient.

In one day you could have better eyesight and shinier teeth. You could be taller, shorter, wider, narrower. And the changes would be temporary too, since you could go back the next day and reverse them.

I would like to try out being tall, for instance, although I might like to return to my original height once I had bumped my head too many times.

It might be fun to have wings. Or to be able to jump like a kangaroo. Or to have a tail to hold that extra bag of groceries or to swing from one library stack to another. Clothes might be a problem but the dry cleaner probably offers alterations on clothing too.

But why stop at physical alterations?

I’d love to be better at accounting, for instance. I’m not good at drawing either, but the tailor could alter that. I’d love to speak the world’s languages fluently, to be able to dance like a professional, to throw a baseball one hundred miles an hour. Or to be able to swim like a seal and catch fish in my mouth. Well, maybe not the fish part.

And then there are less positive attributes, like laziness or unwarranted melancholy. I could use an alteration in my mood some days and in my self-discipline on others. Some days, both at once.

But truthfully, even if the drycleaner’s sign was accurate, I wouldn’t take advantage of it. It’s not that I don’t want to change and grow. I do.

But I want to be the agent of that change myself. Being the alterations mistress of me is a lot more fun than having someone else do it. Even if that means I can’t have wings or a tail.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

Book Review

Book Review: Joanna Shupe’s Magnate

Every book review should incorporate a fun word like Knickerbocker.

A book review a day later than expected is always tastier than one which shows up at the usual time. Well, that’s my rationale, anyway. And what’s on the menu today? Joanna Shupe’s Magnate, one of the four books in her Knickerbocker Club series.

I generally avoid books which focus on the tribulations of being vastly wealthy. I mean, please.

But I am intrigued by that time period in American history. 1870-1900 was an incredibly exciting time to witness. Industrial growth, extremes of financial fortune, and women’s rights are fascinating themes for an author to explore and to weave in and around the central story arc.

Shupe incorporates all three of these aspects of life in the late 1800’s without missing a beat.

That’s significant because I often find novels set in far-away places or times contrived.

Sometimes it feels as though the author needs to justify her cruise down the Danube to a beleaguered IRS employee. “See here,” she can say, pointing vigorously at chapter 19, “That’s an exact description of the meal I ate in a tiny café near Schonbrunn Palace.”

Or, if it’s a historical, she has probably spent hours and hours in dusty archives. All that curling over ancient documents practically requires a professional masseur. “See the fifteen pages delineating the growth of shirtwaist production?” The IRS agent nods sadly and makes a notation. “That was a four hour massage, right there.”

But to my delight, Shupe respects her readers.

The setting and time frame are so intrinsic to the plot, I was never once distracted by a protracted lecture on, say, the history of the Rossini Club. That sort of information was organic to the flow.

As a reader this matters to me. As a writer, it matters more.

Like any good teacher, Shupe holds back a little. She tells the reader exactly what the reader needs to know. Which makes me curious. And a curious reader is exactly what an author wants.

Now I’m hooked.

And I also have a better sense of how to hook my own readers.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

group

Group Dynamics Redeem Themselves

Turns out joining a group can be fun!

I never had much experience with the benefits of group membership as a child. The groups I was acquainted with were the unpleasant sort. The kind which incorporated mean kids and ruled the playground with an iron fist.

But as an adult, I have slowly come to understand how helpful a group can be both as a social bridge and a professional aid. Which is why I have become such a fan of the writing community and the groups which it forms.

At Rhode Island Romance Writers monthly meetings, I’ve received advice on writing, branding and marketing skills. Just as important, I’ve been able to meet a group of actual writers who, it turns out, are amazingly friendly.

As part of attending the Boston area romance writers conference, I joined New England Chapter of Romance Writers of America (NECRWA). At the conference I had the chance to meet several of the members. They too have been uniformly welcoming and helpful.

The NECRWA conference itself was an extraordinary experience. On a professional level, I was exposed to in depth information on the business of writing and selling books I wouldn’t normally have had access to. But the social aspect, again, took me by surprise.

I made friends.

I don’t know if this is a function of the groups I am meeting, but I’ve been blown away by a universal camaraderie. Experienced authors share information and advised rank beginners with a notable and laudable spirit of generosity. Fellow beginners share their knowledge, secure in the sense that this experience is not about competition but about lifting each other up.

Someday, I will attend the big one – the Romance Writers of America conference. I don’t know whether I will find the same level of welcoming friendliness there, but I think it’s possible.

If there is one thing I’ve learned about writers since I started meeting them, it’s that we all have the same hill to climb and we have to climb it again every day.

This takes a lot of the hierarchy out of writers’ groups.

Because even a million dollar writer starts out every morning the way she did when she first began – staring at a blank sheet and hoping the words will come easy today.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

fortune

Fortune Cookies and the Optimism of Destiny

Fortune cookies are cheerful by nature. Consider their crunch, their smooth surface, their mild sweetness. Note the way they can be snapped into neat halves in one smooth motion.

More importantly, check out the incredibly upbeat messages inside.

For years, every time I had a fortune cookie, I saved the little slips of paper. Now I have a collection of flattering if sometimes conflicting descriptions of myself.

Who doesn’t want to know she is charming, sweet tempered and destined to succeed at whatever she puts her mind to? But none of the fortunes, no matter how varied are negative.

Maybe the people who write the maxims on fortune cookie slips are incurably optimistic. Or maybe they are simply wishful about humanity. A few of them may believe they are changing the world one fortune cookie insert at a time.

And they might be right.

Still, I sometimes wonder what sorts of descriptions and predictions might arrive in my cookies if the writer was having a bad day. You are temperamental and have a tendency toward procrastination, one slip might say. Avoid Gluttony – Start by not eating this cookie, might be another one.

Or how about: The path before you is difficult. Go back to bed.

I’m not quite sure why I keep those little slips. The messages are neither deep nor personally insightful. But somehow I can’t make myself throw them out.

They’re a bit like a smile from a baby in a passing stroller. The smile isn’t personal. The baby doesn’t know you. But still, a baby’s smile has a kind of intrinsic value regardless of what the baby was thinking at the time.

The fortune cookie strips I keep are like this – impersonal but still bearing an odd significance.

Among the pile of paper strips, the one I love most is the one I understand the least.

He is kissing her triding keepsake.

I still wonder what the writer meant by that.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.