publicity

Publicity and Indie Publishing. And Windmills.

Publicity for your book launch used to be the responsibility of a traditional publisher.

The author would make herself available for the publicity opportunities the publisher arranged. These could include book signings, interviews, or talks at libraries.

In addition, the publisher would arrange for placement on bookstore shelves. The book, not the author. Although that too could probably be arranged.

Also, the publisher would enter the book in contests, promote the book in the appropriate journals. Also purchase advertisements as appropriate.

But fellow authors tell me and my reading confirms that traditional publishers no longer take all the responsibility for publicizing a new book. In part, this is because traditional publishers expect to turn their focus to the next book fairly quickly.

Remember, a traditional publisher sinks significant money into the initial production and broadcast of a book. Once the publisher makes the investment back and, hopefully, a profit, moving on to the next book makes sense. From a publisher’s perspective, while it is nice to have ongoing profits from a book. Unless you wrote the next Don Quixote, the real money is in the launch.

And yes, Don Quixote is the best selling non-religious fiction book of all time. Who knew?

This means that when it comes to publicity, what was once a large gap in obligation between authors who are traditionally published and indie authors has narrowed.

As far as I can tell, the biggest difference in time commitment relates to the learning curve for indie authors. Traditionally published authors presumably have expert guidance in what needs to be done in regards to publicity.

An indie publisher must gather information on how best to publicize her book on her own. This means sometimes she will rely on mistaken or incomplete advice.

There are professional publicists who will, for a fee, do an indie authors publicity and guide her through the process. But, like doing one’s own formatting, there are certain advantages to conquering the mountain one’s self.

For one thing, you only have to learn how to do it once. After that, it’s easy. Plus, if you ever have to launch something other than a book, like a communal campaign to ride swaybacked horses while jousting with windmills, you’ll know how to do it.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

formatting

Formatting and the Indies. Wait, is that a Band?

As I consider the differences between traditional and indie publishing, formatting leaps to mind. This is only an issue for those of us who indie publish, but it can be a significant one.

No romance reader of my acquaintance checks a binding for the publisher’s name before choosing a book. But weird formatting like off center chapter headings or margin justification run awry does make a reader wonder.

And the last thing any author wants is for her reader to stop thinking about the hero’s romantic crisis and start paying attention to uneven spacing. Yeesh!

Traditional publishers will format a manuscript for both print and ebook. That’s one way they protect their investment. An indie publisher who wants to protect her investment of time, effort and money, should aim for the same level of quality.

Luckily, fellow authors are remarkably generous in their advice. When I first began learning about formatting, I found detailed instructions online from dozens of bloggers.

I am in awe of folks who blithely talk about waltzing through their formatting in an hour. It takes me a good deal longer. And I am not waltzing, more like clogging, without the finesse.

Using the binder I filled with detailed formatting instructions, it usually takes me about half a day to format my manuscript for paperback.

And a whole day to format it for ebook devices. Because the only reliable way I can do it is by using HTML. And I’m not exactly proficient in hate mail, I mean, HTML.

I really should think of it as hot meal. Then I would look forward to it.

These indie publishers may just be better at formatting than I am. And no doubt they have more practice. But they may also have Macintosh computers.

Many online formatting guides are specific to Macintosh or to the Macintosh version of Scrivener.

Scrivener, a writing program with a lot of cool features, was initially designed for Macs. I own the PC version which has less of those useful cool features. The company is working on that. In the interim, if you want an easier formatting experience, you’ll need to buy a Macintosh.

But if you want to grow big formatting muscles and develop a large vocabulary of inventive curse words, you’ll use a PC. It’s a lot less expensive than a Macintosh and you get bragging rights.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

indie publishing

Indie Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing

In my last entry, I discussed weighing the value of time when considering whether to pursue traditional publishing as opposed to indie publishing. Based on my own experience, I have come to the conclusion that traditional publishing is more expensive for an author than most of us beginner writers realize.

But indie publishing is no slouch when it comes to time consumption either. Not to mention actual coin of the realm.

Whether you plan to publish a paperback or an ebook, your book will need a cover. And not just any cover – the sort of cover which says, “Buy me. I will bring you laughter, tears of joy and I will infect you with a burning desire to read the sequel.”

So, unless you are a talented graphic artist, you will need to hire a designer. There is a monetary cost, of course. But there is a time cost as well. Because you have to think about what you want in some detail beforehand and must convey that clearly to your designer ahead of time and during the process.

Traditional publishers make those cover design decisions on an author’s behalf and use their own designers to do the actual work. Author friends have told me they sometimes dislike the cover choices their publishers make and feel those choices can impact on the number of sales. In addition, the publisher’s designers quite reasonably expect to be paid for their work. Which impacts in some small measure on the advance a publisher is willing to offer.

So in a real sense, there is a financial cost to an author either way.

And that’s just the outside of the book.

Formatting your manuscript so you can hold your very own book requires some significant author patience. Not to mention research.

Hiring a knowledgeable person to format your work for you is one way to make that happen. But then you will miss all the fun. Plus, you won’t get to swear like a pirate’s parrot. An opportunity no one should miss.

So in my next entry, I will wax eloquent on the joys and risks of formatting.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

literary agent

Literary Agent Search or the Alternative

In a way, my last blog entry, was about the value of time. Masquerading as a blog entry about searching for a literary agent. Or was it the other way around?

I used to love putting a quarter into the mini-vending machines in the supermarket lobby. In exchange, I might get a tiny ball laced with little flecks of multicolored glitter. Or a chalky flavored necklace made of pastel candy beads. Or even the coveted gold colored wristwatch which mysteriously never kept time.

Receiving an offer of representation by a literary agent is flattering. It means someone is willing to risk his quarter on the chance your book will sell.

Publishers, too, are gambling on the book’s success. A publisher spends money on producing a book in quantity for bookstores as well as on paying an advance to the author. But this pre-expenditure of a whole lot of quarters is exactly why publishers are cautious.

But Benjamin Franklin, the time management guru of the 1700’s, pointed out Time is Money. A person who could be earning ten dollars an hour but sits in Starbucks half a day not writing, he says, is actually losing more than the cost of her triple mocha latte. She’s losing the cost of the drink plus the $40 less local, state, federal taxes and withholding —

Okay, that’s not exactly what he said, but you get my drift. And his. Time is valuable.

And it seems to me that the person who is putting in the most time on any novel is the author.

The author has put all her quarters into that vending machine. She is totally committed to the bouncy ball, necklace or watch encased in a see-through plastic orb which will roll down the chute when she turns the knob. So in a very real sense, emotional investment aside, the author has a financial investment in each book that far exceeds the investment an agent or even a publisher is likely to make.

Which raises a question, Ms. Author.

Who is more likely to work her buns off to make your book succeed? You or your literary agent?

Who cares more about your long term success as a writer, you or your publisher?

If you answered “Me” maybe you should consider indie publishing.

In my next blog entry in this series, I’ll explore the challenges of indie publishing as compared with traditional publishing.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

agent

Agent Searching or the Alternative, Part 1

Realtors are eager for listings, but their passion fades quickly. If the house does not sell within the first three weeks, the agent will relegate it to their B-List.

This is reasonable because real estate agents are in business to make money.

Literary agents, by contrast, won’t take on a manuscript unless they are nearly positive they can sell it to a specific buyer.

Which explains why agents say “no” often.

A “no” from a literary agent is not necessarily a comment on the quality of the manuscript as it is on whether the agent considers it a quick and easy sale. So if the work of your heart is about camels and the “in” theme next year is likely to be dromedaries the answer will be a polite form rejection.

This is reasonable because literary agents are in business to make money.

But we authors, whether traditionally published or indie published also wish to make money from our time and labor. So it behooves us (How often do you get a chance to use that in a sentence? Woot, woot!) to think about how we are using that time.

Over the past six months, I’ve devoted at least one hundred hours to an agent search.

This includes finding appropriate agents, sending each one a query letter in the form and manner they prefer, and reading their responses. Sending out more queries, tracking which agents responded and which are still silent. Going to agency websites to find out what their response time-frames are, and whether they allow sending a follow up query to a second agent in their group if the first rejects. Sending a second query if its allowed and noting on my spreadsheet if it isn’t. Calendaring those response timeframes and updating my spreadsheet with them and sending reminder queries to agents who asked for full copies of my manuscript.

Note, I do not include time required to calm down after a request for a partial or full manuscript, or time required to find ice cream after each rejection. Probably another hundred hours, not to mention calories.

And all this, my friends, is to see if I can find not a publisher, but an agent. Because most large publishing houses will not speak directly to authors. They only speak to agents.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

ravens

Ravens. We’re not winning the brain race, folks.

Ravens and macaques are just the beginning.

I’ve always felt there was something a bit presumptuous in assuming we humans are smarter than animals. Not to mention, self serving. Turns out, according to a recent study, ravens are giving us significant competition.

In an article, Scientific American reports a raven’s ability to postpone gratification is at a four year old human’s level. Which is something we should all worry about. Because I can’t speak for anyone else, but I am personally acquainted with grown up humans who don’t have this capacity.

The implication of this finding is ravens can plan ahead further than we suspected. Ravens don’t have watches. Or calendars. Or multi-page tabbed planners with a zipper ring binder made out of leather. Reasonable, since those binders are pretty inconvenient to fly around with and take up way too much room in the nest.

But just think what they could do if they had those things.

Better yet, maybe instead of banding ravens for scientific study, we should be fitting them with little electronic planners. According to the article, a raven only expects to find a carcass occasionally, so there are a lot of empty hours a raven might choose to fill more productively.

Ravens aren’t the only animals who might benefit from electronic devices. As I write this entry, there is a lawsuit about who owns the rights to selfies taken by a female macaque in Indonesia. The photographer who set up his camera with a remote trigger, says he expected the macaques in the area to find it and play with it.

Personally, I think the question of rights over the selfies is missing the point. The real issue is, shouldn’t all animals have their own electronic devices? If E.T. arrived on earth now, surely he would carry his own cell phone along with him. And if aliens have cell phones, why should our animal citizens do without?

Charging devices in the wild might be a problem, but I hear fireflies and electric eels are considering a merger to create the first Animal Power Company. So maybe not.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

Book Review

Book Review: Meg Cabot’s The Boy Is Back

Book review Wednesday strikes on Thursday. Shaking it up, here.

I haven’t read a lot of graphic novels, but I like the freshness of them. The Boy is BackMeg Cabot’s latest foray into adult romance isn’t exactly a graphic novel, but the format is so much fun it made me laugh out loud.

One of the challenges of writing romances is finding the balance between the way people communicate in books and the way they communicate in real life.

Which is, of course, the point.

Alfred Hitchcock famously said, “What is drama but life with the dull bits cut out?”

Fiction writers are encouraged to focus on the extraordinary moments of otherwise ordinary lives. But sometimes it’s a relief to read a book which describes the prosaic with the level of joy and appreciation which The Boy is Back exhibits. There is a pivotal love story but the ordinary life around the couple is almost a third character.

And a very special thank you to Cabot for the family tree at the very beginning of the book. There is a special place on the aggravating book shelf for the other kind.

You know.  The ones in which you struggle through three hundred plus pages trying to remember just how Henry is related to the main character. You only learn he is her long lost step uncle when you stumble on an appendix on page 327.

There must be some readers out there who leaf through a book ahead of time marking appendices and footnotes with unseemly relish. I’m not one of them.

Which makes me wonder about who those people are and what else they do with their time. Dust moldings daily? Fold their dirty laundry before heading to the Laundromat? Use partitioned plates for meals so the green beans don’t touch the mashed potatoes?

I like a sense of organization, but I am well aware it is a losing battle. And I like books which reflect that. Hence this book review.

Cabot cleverly mimics the pace of online communication. It’s not a gimmick – it’s a device. And it’s a believable device. Most of us do communicate this way now, although perhaps not all as intensely as the family in this story does.

And while what she describes in those communications is ordinary life, she does so with such vigor and particularity, it is anything but dull.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

Synopsis

Synopsis Writing: Hate it or Love it?

Why is writing a synopsis so hard? We all grew up doing book reports, summaries of coursework. We all had to study for exams by skimming our class notes. In sifting between the significant items we accumulated from our teachers, we identified the critical information.

So why should it be so difficult to do so with material we wrote ourselves?

I have friends who form their synopses early in the writing process. It’s a great idea. But I find as I write, the initial outline changes form. And soon the manuscript resembles something else entirely.

My initial synopsis always ends up being a terrific description of a romance novel I didn’t write.

But the process of condensing an intricate tale into one page after the manuscript is finished is hard too. Primarily, I think because it feels almost demeaning to the story. We writers work so hard to only use the right words, no more and no less than what the story requires. So reducing our manuscript to the bare bones feels counter intuitive.

But lovely well chosen words are not enough.

Jane Friedman, in her excellent blog article on the intricacies and pitfalls of synopsis writing, points out a synopsis is not intended to be simply a list of plot events. Instead, it should focus on the emotions of the characters as they react to the events and the decisions which grow out of those emotions.

I like this idea, because if I have written my manuscript properly, these things should be self evident to me. Or, to put it another way, maybe if I’m having this much difficulty defining the most important aspects of the manuscript, a reader will too.

Not good.

It’s a mistake to think of the synopsis as an irritating pointless tag on to our creative work.

Delicious use of language is only one part of a manuscript éclair, maybe the layered pastry shell. But character growth and conflict, are the custard filling and the chocolate glaze.

The process of writing a good synopsis allows the author a chance to check if all the ingredients are present. Which is important. Because no one wants an empty éclair.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

Alterations

Alterations Men Women Children. Really?

It’s a Sign. Of something.

Every week on my way home from the supermarket I drive by an unpretentious dry cleaning establishment. It offers same day service. On the side of the building there is a startling banner which proclaims: Alterations Men Women Children.

It’s not so much the punctuation issue, although that probably is an issue. You know – the difference between “Let’s eat, Grandma,” and “Let’s eat Grandma.”

It’s the idea one could alter oneself overnight which fascinates me. How convenient.

In one day you could have better eyesight and shinier teeth. You could be taller, shorter, wider, narrower. And the changes would be temporary too, since you could go back the next day and reverse them.

I would like to try out being tall, for instance, although I might like to return to my original height once I had bumped my head too many times.

It might be fun to have wings. Or to be able to jump like a kangaroo. Or to have a tail to hold that extra bag of groceries or to swing from one library stack to another. Clothes might be a problem but the dry cleaner probably offers alterations on clothing too.

But why stop at physical alterations?

I’d love to be better at accounting, for instance. I’m not good at drawing either, but the tailor could alter that. I’d love to speak the world’s languages fluently, to be able to dance like a professional, to throw a baseball one hundred miles an hour. Or to be able to swim like a seal and catch fish in my mouth. Well, maybe not the fish part.

And then there are less positive attributes, like laziness or unwarranted melancholy. I could use an alteration in my mood some days and in my self-discipline on others. Some days, both at once.

But truthfully, even if the drycleaner’s sign was accurate, I wouldn’t take advantage of it. It’s not that I don’t want to change and grow. I do.

But I want to be the agent of that change myself. Being the alterations mistress of me is a lot more fun than having someone else do it. Even if that means I can’t have wings or a tail.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.

Book Review

Book Review: Joanna Shupe’s Magnate

Every book review should incorporate a fun word like Knickerbocker.

A book review a day later than expected is always tastier than one which shows up at the usual time. Well, that’s my rationale, anyway. And what’s on the menu today? Joanna Shupe’s Magnate, one of the four books in her Knickerbocker Club series.

I generally avoid books which focus on the tribulations of being vastly wealthy. I mean, please.

But I am intrigued by that time period in American history. 1870-1900 was an incredibly exciting time to witness. Industrial growth, extremes of financial fortune, and women’s rights are fascinating themes for an author to explore and to weave in and around the central story arc.

Shupe incorporates all three of these aspects of life in the late 1800’s without missing a beat.

That’s significant because I often find novels set in far-away places or times contrived.

Sometimes it feels as though the author needs to justify her cruise down the Danube to a beleaguered IRS employee. “See here,” she can say, pointing vigorously at chapter 19, “That’s an exact description of the meal I ate in a tiny café near Schonbrunn Palace.”

Or, if it’s a historical, she has probably spent hours and hours in dusty archives. All that curling over ancient documents practically requires a professional masseur. “See the fifteen pages delineating the growth of shirtwaist production?” The IRS agent nods sadly and makes a notation. “That was a four hour massage, right there.”

But to my delight, Shupe respects her readers.

The setting and time frame are so intrinsic to the plot, I was never once distracted by a protracted lecture on, say, the history of the Rossini Club. That sort of information was organic to the flow.

As a reader this matters to me. As a writer, it matters more.

Like any good teacher, Shupe holds back a little. She tells the reader exactly what the reader needs to know. Which makes me curious. And a curious reader is exactly what an author wants.

Now I’m hooked.

And I also have a better sense of how to hook my own readers.

Rose Grey has written three romance novels and is hard at work on a fourth. Wednesday is generally book review day. Unless it isn’t. If you liked this post, come visit the rest of the blog at www.rosegreybooks.com. Hot Pursuit and Not As Advertised are available as ebooks and as paperbacks online.