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Need a break? Try Waiting For You!

Max Durrell is back in town but Aidy Jones needs a man who can fix a roof. Not one who will steal her heart.  Again.

 

The day Max Durrell books a room at The Grand Hotel, Aidy Jones, hotel manager, signs up for a dating service. Aidy knows what she needs and Max isn’t it. Her ideal man is attractive enough to have children with but not attractive enough to fall in love with. Ideally, he’ll also have some roofing skills.

Max has returned to Demerest Cove to accomplish a lifelong dream. The Grand isn’t on the market yet, but convincing the eccentric owners to sell should be a piece of cake. His brothers will take care of the transaction. Max’s job is to flirt with the owners’ daughter so she doesn’t interfere.

Flirting is easy. It’s the friendship that’s the problem. He can’t help enjoying Aidy and while he’ll never fall in love again (Been there. Bought the tux. Bride never showed up.) he is falling in like with her. Deeply in like.

But any day now, the sale will go through. And once Aidy learns Max is the one tearing her beloved hotel away from her, she’ll never want to set eyes on him again.

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Books I Go Back To

A Company of Swans by Eva Ibbotson

Ms. Ibbotson walked a fine line between sweet and saccharine in this story. If her main characters are a tiny bit superhuman in terms of their ethics, you still wish they were your friends.

But what I really love, and why I go back to this particular book, is the way Ibbotson built the story. Her basic setup is so stable and thorough, the most serendipitous of occurrences seem perfectly acceptable to the reader. As a result, the ending is enormously satisfying.

I aspire to creating that kind of inevitability in my story lines.

On Writing Romance by Leigh Michaels

This is my go to book for romance character development. Ms. Michael’s interview questions for main and even side characters are so detailed that by the time I have finished answering them, I have no doubt who I am writing about. The list of information is critical when I forget or lose track of a character’s attributes and need to get back on track.

On Writing by Stephen King

This book, I think, is Mr. King’s true masterpiece. Writing can feel a lot like gardening in April, a lot of back breaking labor covered up by unexpected snowfalls and delayed gratification. I reread this book to remind myself that even prolific and well received writers struggle to produce and aren’t always pleased with the results.

Romancing the Beat by Gwen Hayes

This slim little book reminds me of Mary Poppins’ portmanteau. Every time you think you have taken out everything which is useful, you reach in one more time and find yet another important item. Ms. Hayes is sensitive to the unique issues of romance novel structure and explains those issues simply and clearly.

When I am working on plot structure for a romance novel, Romancing the Beat is right next to me.